Back to the Future: A History of SoHo from the 1700’s through the Present

Collect Pond: 1700’s — The Collect Pond was a fresh water pond that served as the main water supply for the city, located just south of the intersection of present day Broadway and Canal Street.  In the early 1700’s, the area was used for recreation, but by the late-1700's, the pond became very polluted with industrial waste. (image: Wikimedia Commons, Archibald Robertson)

Collect Pond: 1700’s — The Collect Pond was a fresh water pond that served as the main water supply for the city, located just south of the intersection of present day Broadway and Canal Street. In the early 1700’s, the area was used for recreation, but by the late-1700’s, the pond became very polluted with industrial waste. (image: Wikimedia Commons, Archibald Robertson)

I recently gave a presentation about the history of the area of Manhattan that is now called SoHo at Judd Foundation for their artist/guides so that they could better contextualize Judd’s SoHo (1960’s/1970’s) as well as his building (constructed in 1870) within the larger history of New York City.  I have revised and expanded the presentation as a slide show (see below).  Click on any image to enlarge.  Enjoy your trip down memory lane!

Tags: ,

4 Responses to “Back to the Future: A History of SoHo from the 1700’s through the Present”

  1. Carol Goodden Says:

    Great post, Yuki. Fascinating pictures. I am so lucky to have been part of the late ’60s and ’70s in the big change-over of SoHo, building FOOD, Julie Judd’s fight to stop the Broome St. Expressway, Don Judd’s beautiful building on Spring St., ad infinitum. I will be in NYC this coming week for a few days for the dedication of the new wing of the Whitney Museum.

  2. Benjamin Feldman Says:

    For more and much more about Niblo’s Garden, get a copy of my biography of the proprietor, out July 12th, 2014: “East in Eden: William Niblo and His Pleasure Garden of Yore.’ Email me at Feldman_benjamin@hotmail.com for purchase details and more info. Also please attend the second annual “Night at Niblo’s Garden” at Green-Wood Cemetery on Saturday July 12th at 7:00 pm: see http://www.green-wood.com/event/a-night-at-niblos-garden/ for details:-)

  3. Virginia Piersol Says:

    As I recall, the legalization of loft living in Soho depended on a rezoning of manufacturing to mixed use and required a vote in the state assembly. The activism may have begun in the 70s, but the law was passed after I moved into 112 Franklin, which wasn’t until 1976. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1982_Loft_Law

    My first loft, behind Fanelli’s, had been used by a gold-stamping business for leather goods. 112 Franklin St. was a fabric refolding business that converted wholesale rolls of fabric to retail-store size rolls. Our two lower floors and the building next door were mercantile marine supply stores. The fire department was happy to have tenants in buildings that were becoming unattractive compared to New Jersey’s newer horizontal spaces because it reduced the number of spontaneous combustion fires.

  4. Virginia Piersol Says:

    Also, there were good Dominican and other restaurants tucked into small corners of Soho which fed the dock workers breakfast and lunch. And of course having Italian neighborhoods to the west and east of Soho made for good eating and great food shopping. Somewhere before Lafayette, on Spring or Prince, was a brick oven bakery with low round loaves to die for.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 629 other followers

%d bloggers like this: